During the first 24 hours after anesthesia or after any pain medicine that makes you drowsy the following apply:

1. Your breathing, balance, coordination, memory, concentration and judgment may be impaired. For these reasons, a responsible adult should stay with you for the first 12 – 24 hours after receiving anesthesia.

2. Do NOT drive a motor vehicle or travel alone on public transportation. You will not be allowed to drive yourself home after anesthesia. You must arrange for a driver. Taxis or bus transport after anesthesia is not acceptable.

3. Do NOT use machinery or sharp items (lawn mower, power saw, kitchen knife etc).

4. Do NOT absorb sole care of an infant, young child or other dependent.

5. Do NOT make important legal or financial decisions.

6. Do NOT drink alcoholic beverages. The combination of alcohol with residual medications can be deadly.Use caution with cold medicines, anti-histamines, pain medications and anxiety medications because you may be more sensitive to their sedating effects. Combinations of these medications can cause deadly effects on your breathing.

7. Patients at risk for sleep apnea should always wear their CPAP or BiPAP mask while sleeping day or night. If you do not have access to CPAP / BiPAP or the location of your surgical incision makes use of the mask impossible, you should sleep in an upright position and / or on your side rather than on your back to improve your breathing.

Post-operative Pain

Your pain should be tolerable, but do not expect to be completely without discomfort. The amount of pain you experience depends on the type of procedure, your genetic makeup, and your emotional state. After surgery, rest in a relaxing environment surrounded by supportive family or friends. Do not be afraid to use pain medicine prescribed by your surgeon as instructed. There is very low risk of becoming addicted to pain medicine during short-term post-operative use. Generally speaking, reducing pain will allow for more activity which helps maintain lung function and prevent dangerous blood clots.

Post-endoscopy Pain

Your pain should be tolerable, but do not expect to be completely without discomfort. The amount of pain you experience depends on the type of procedure, your genetic makeup, and your emotional state. Medical gas is often gently blown into the gastrointestinal system during endoscopy. Most of the discomfort from the procedure can be relieved by passing this gas. Light activity is helpful in accomplishing this.

Nausea or Vomiting

The chance of nausea and vomiting (N / V) is highest in nonsmoking females with a history of motion sickness, but anesthesia and pain medicines can contribute to N / V in anyone. You can reduce your risk of N / V by taking pain medicines with food, avoiding quick movements, and avoiding milk products in the early time period after anesthesia. If you are experiencing N / V, try to drink clear liquids in small quantities until the symptoms resolve. Gradually, advance your diet with low-fat, bland foods.

Other Discomforts

You may experience dry mouth or sore throat after a procedure. You can ease throttle discomfort with ice chips or gargling with lightly salted lukewarm water. Over-the-counter throat lozenges or topical spray can also be helpful. Occidentally, patients experience mild to moderate neck or jaw discomfort. This can be due to positioning during the procedure to keep your airway open while you sleep. A small number of patients may experience a temporary all-over muscle soreness. This muscle soreness may feel similar to the soreness experienced the day after an intense session at the gym. It is caused by one of the medications used in anesthesia. These discomforts are self-limited and usually resolve within 72 hours. Bruising, redness or tenderness may occur near the former site of the intravenous (IV). Place an ice pack over the site for 30 minutes if this occurs. If the symptoms worsen, please contact your procedural physician's office.